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Carroll High School Blog

Student of the Week: Grace Norman '23

November 17, 2021
By Carroll High School
Student of the Week Grace Norman '23: November 17, 2021

Grace Norman '23, Mercy House, with Mrs. Linda Edwards

Grace is truly friendly.  I do not have her in class, but she speaks to me every day.  She has become my go-to for a shadow guide because she is just so nice.

-Mrs. Linda Edwards

What activities do you participate in?

I am currently in Spanish Club, and I am on the Girls Bowling team.

What's your favorite part of being a student at Carroll?

Honestly, my favorite part of being a student at Carroll is the community we have. I love the teachers and how they are here for you regardless if you take their class or not. I feel that the teachers love their students and know that we are human too, and that we make mistakes and mess up. I feel like this is a really important thing some schools forget.

What should school “do” for you?

I feel like school should prepare us for life outside of academics. It should prepare us for college, but also give us skills for how to deal with life, if we decide not to go to college. I feel like you should be able to take at least one (hopefully more) thing you learned and be able to apply it outside of academics in a positive way. It should also prepare you well for college.

What’s a lesson you learned when you overcame a difficult obstacle?

That a support system of love can really be the thing you need to get through, and it is a lot easier to weather the storm when you have someone.  Also, a small act of kindness can go a long way when someone is having a bad day.

What’s your biggest dream in life?

To find a job I love and surround myself with the people I love.

How do you like spending your free time?

I love to read, play games with my dogs and  spending time with my friends.

Posted in Voices of Tomorrow

Eight keys to choosing and researching an award-winning science fair project

November 15, 2021
By Carroll High School Science Department Chairs Mrs. Laurie Fuhr and Mrs. Laura Wright
A Carroll High School student presents STEM research at Science Day

Superior Science Research Projects require students to work independently with the help of a teacher-mentor and should incorporate the following:

They start with thorough background research to find a real-world problem that can be solved either through experimentation or through engineering design. This research should also help students be able to explain key concepts and past research in their topic area.

To truly stand out a project should incorporate a unique topic, procedure, or practical application; something the judges have not seen before. The project should not be a lab exercise that could be done in a classroom.

A Carroll High School student presents STEM research at Carroll Science Day

During the experimentation or engineering build phase students should have a complex experimental or design procedure, and there should be numerous subjects or trials for more accurate data. Students should review their data through statistical analysis to see if there are significant differences between test groups.

Once the project is complete, students should be able to express themselves clearly during their oral presentation to judges from the scientific community using an organized display board. Students must also write a comprehensive scientific research paper which includes their background research, experimental procedure, results and analysis. The students must integrate their project results into findings from previous research.

Posted in Voices of Learning

Student of the Week: Tami James '23

November 10, 2021
By Carroll High School
Student of the Week Tami James '23: November 10, 2021

Tami James '23, St. Mary's House, with Mrs. Cecelia Grosselin

Tami knows what it means to take responsibility for her education in order to be successful in class. Despite a busy schedule of activities, Tami always structures her time so she can come in before or after school for extra help.  Tami knows she must take the initiative to ask for assistance in order to understand new concepts, review notes, or go over homework problems she missed.

-Mrs. Cecelia Grosselin

What activities do you participate in?

In school, I participate in Carroll Football and Basketball Cheer, Carroll Girl Scout Troop, and the Carroll Drama Club.  Outside of school, I participate in Dayton Academy of Gymnastics -  All-Star Cheer.

What's your favorite part of being a student at Carroll?

One of my favorite parts of being a student at Carroll is the House System. I am blessed with an amazing Family Room. Another one of my favorite parts is being able to cheer at the football and basketball games. It’s a great way of getting involved in the Carroll spirit, and it’s a great way to see everyone.

What should school “do” for you?

I believe a school should genuinely care about their students' education. The school should also create a close and caring community amongst the students, faculty, and community.

What’s a lesson you learned when you overcame a difficult obstacle?

I learned that there is no shame in asking for help when you need it. It just shows that you care for your own educational gain, and it can even help you create a closer bond to your teachers. I also learned that not everything and everyone is perfect. Someone sitting right next to you may be struggling just like you, and by taking the time to ask your question, you may have just helped them realize that they’re not alone, and bonds are made.

What’s your biggest dream in life?

My biggest dream is to go to The Cheerleading Worlds competition, and win the whole Worlds competition.

How do you like spending your free time?

I love going to live performing arts shows (plays, musicals, dance exhibitions, etc). I especially LOVE going to watch ballets - my favorites are The Nutcracker and Swan Lake.

Posted in Voices of Tomorrow

Jean (Geiger) Bussell '74 Completes the Path to Achieving her Lifelong Dream

November 09, 2021
By Carroll High School
Jean (Geiger) Bussell '74 at Katahdin after finishing a thru-hike of the Appalachian Trail

As a child, Jean (Geiger) Bussell ‘74 grew up loving the outdoors.  She would often be found outside climbing trees, and her family would camp often. Although her father, Frank Geiger, passed away when she was only three years old, Jean’s mother, Mary Geiger, continued taking Jean and her four siblings on the camping trips that fostered Jean’s love for the outdoors. While sitting in her fourth grade classroom at Immaculate Conception School, Bussell learned about the ultimate outdoor experience, the Appalachian Trail. It was in that classroom that she decided that, one day, she would hike the entire trail. This past fall, Jean finally got the chance to accomplish her lifelong goal.

Jean (Geiger) Bussell '74 and her husband Buddy at the start of the Appalachian Trail at Springer Mountain in Georgia
Jean (Geiger) Bussell '74 and her husband Buddy at the start of the Appalachian Trail at Springer Mountain in Georgia

The Appalachian Trail stretches nearly 2,190 miles starting in Georgia's Springer Mountain, and more than 3,000 thru-hikers attempt the entire journey each year, with roughly a quarter of those attempts ending in success at Mount Katahdin in Maine.  Bussell was determined to be a thru-hiker who would make it all the way to Maine. She and her husband, Don, decided that they would hike the trail together. “He didn’t really have that dream, but he didn’t want me to go by myself, so he went with me,” said Bussell. They decided to hike the trail after Jean retired from the teaching profession in 2017 and Don, known to his friends as Buddy, retired from being a pilot for Delta Air Lines in 2019. They officially registered themselves on the Appalachian Trail Conservancy and set their start date for April 9, 2020. 

To prepare for the long journey, Jean read books that thru-hikers had written about their experiences. From them, she learned about both the trail itself and other crucial information, including the equipment she would need, the best ways to keep her hiking pack light, and the dehydrated food she should pack. Experienced hiker outfitters also assisted Bussell and her husband prepare for the trip. To physically prepare, Bussell would go running and take light day hikes consisting of a couple of miles. Surprisingly, her first long distance hike would be the Appalachian Trail itself. 

Right before their departure, they received information from the Appalachian Trail Conservancy that their registration was canceled, as most of the country was still shut down due to the coronavirus. So, they re-planned their journey and set out on April 13, 2021.

Jean (Geiger) Bussell '74 with her husband Buddy on the Appalachian Trail
Jean (Geiger) Bussell '74 with her husband Buddy on the Appalachian Trail

“The trail wasn’t what I thought at first,” recalled Bussell, “I thought it’d be like a trail on a path, like Hocking Hills. But, it’s climbing big elevations and coming down on rocks, bouldering, and fording rivers and streams. It’s not like a hike in the park.” Like many thru-hikers, Jean found that the trail trained gave her the “trail legs” she would need, that although she and her husband were only able to do 8-10 miles per day for the first few days, she would end up doing over 20 miles per day towards the end of her journey.

I got to accomplish my dream.  I didn’t quit or give up when it got hard. I persevered, and I felt good about that.

-Jean (Geiger) Bussell '74

Along the way, a shuttle driver told Jean that, “The Appalachian Trail is the longest small town in America,” and she found that to be very true, since she would encounter the same groups of young thru-hikers who would end up becoming her best cheerleaders on the trail. “We didn’t hike with each other during the day, but at the shelters and in town, we’d run into each other again.” She was surprised at how kind and helpful everyone was on the trail, and she observed her fellow thru-hikers offering food and medical supplies to others in need.  “Though we were all different ages and had different backgrounds, we were all hikers," Jean recalled.

Jean and Buddy had many memorable moments journeying together on the trail. Though they have been married for 16 years, they became even more connected and in-tune with each other’s needs. Together, they embraced the hiker lifestyle and did things that they would never do in their daily life, like eating candy bars and other sugary snack foods and hitchhiking from the trail into town.

Jean and Buddy spent their wedding anniversary together in a laundromat in town while on the journey. Unfortunately, Buddy suffered a stress fracture in his back and was unable to complete the final quarter of the trail. After much discussion, they decided that he would return home to recover that August while Jean would finish the final 705 miles on her own. 

After some recovery time, Buddy drove out to Maine in September to assist Jean achieve her dream. He would meet her where the trail came out onto roads and helped with such tasks as resupplying her equipment and shopping for groceries. They even car camped when Jean was in town.

Jean (Geiger) Bussell '74 with her husband Buddy on the Appalachian Trail
Jean (Geiger) Bussell '74 with her husband Buddy on the Appalachian Trail

On September 27, Jean accomplished her dream of successfully completing the entire Appalachian Trail. Her husband was there at the end to greet her, as were several of the younger hikers she had met along the way. “They were very excited for me,” laughed Bussell, “They said, ‘You kept up with us!’” Bussell was very excited for herself as well. “I got to accomplish my dream!” Jean said, “I didn’t quit or give up when it got hard. I persevered, and I felt good about that.”

Looking back at her time on the trail, Jean spent significant time thinking of those early days spent outdoors camping with her mom, who passed away in 1995, and that fourth grade classroom where this dream began. Jean credits her experiences at Carroll High School for developing her ability to overcome and persevere through challenges. She did not have a study hall, and she remembered not having a lot of downtime in the school day. “Carroll taught me to not give up (and) work hard.” 

Bussell shared that lesson on dedication with other travelers she met along the trail. When she found fellow thru-hikers getting discouraged or disappointed that their hike schedules weren’t going as expected, Jean would tell them, “Put your goals in granite but your plans in sand,” with Jean herself being an excellent example of the aphorism she shared. Though she waited many years and navigated through many challenges and obstacles along the way, she was ultimately proud to turn her childhood dream into a reality. 

Posted in Familiar Voices
2 comments

Student of the Week: Lucia Igitego '22

November 03, 2021
By Carroll High School
Student of the Week Lucia Igitego '22: November 3, 2021

Lucia Igitego '22, Gonzaga House, with Mrs. Jenny (Frankenberg) Hentrich '87 

What activities do you participate in?

I am an outfielder for the Softball team, have also been part of the cooking club since freshman year, as well as a member of Femme club.

What's your favorite part of being a student at Carroll?

I love the community and how close everyone is. I also love how all the faculty care about the students and will go out of their way to make sure we have a great day.

What should school “do” for you?

School should make you into the best person you can be. It should be the final step to finally becoming a mature adult and an outstanding person.

What’s a lesson you learned when you overcame a difficult obstacle?

Last fall, I took night classes to obtain my State Tested Nursing Assistant license. After a few months, I graduated from the classes and went on to take my state test. Through this experience, I learned that anything is possible with hard work and effort.

What’s your biggest dream in life?

I hope to start my own company sometime in the future. With this company I hope to be financially comfortable enough to adopt at least 3 kids and also start a program to better help the children in the foster care system.

How do you like spending your free time?

I enjoy writing music, and sometimes, I start writing books but never finish. I also enjoy spending time with my friends and volunteering with them.

Posted in Voices of Tomorrow

Recent Posts

11/17/21 - By Carroll High School
11/15/21 - By Carroll High School Science Department Chairs Mrs. Laurie Fuhr and Mrs. Laura Wright
11/10/21 - By Carroll High School
11/9/21 - By Carroll High School
11/3/21 - By Carroll High School

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