Skip Navigation

Courses in all of the science programs include hands-on STEM Education experiences such as laboratory investigations, lecture-discussion sessions, demonstrations, and cooperative learning.  The history of science and the current advances in technology are incorporated into each science course along with ethical and environmental issues.  Students are required to take three years of science.  The freshmen and sophomore courses fulfill the life science and physical science graduation requirements.

Biology 101/102

Prerequisite: Recommendation from Guidance Department

This course is designed to give a basic understanding of the structure and function of living organisms at the cellular level.  First semester topics include basic biochemistry, cell division, genetics, and respiration.  Second semester topics include photosynthesis, evolution, ecology, environmental problems, and the anatomy and physiology of plant and animal systems.  Laboratory experiments and written reports are an essential part of this course.

Physical Science 101/102

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation

This course introduces selected topics in Chemistry, Earth Science, and Physics.  Students will engage in expanding their understanding of scientific theories, ethical practices, practical applications, and the relationship between science, technology, and society.  Topics explored include the scientific method, science skill, matter, atomic theory, the periodic table, chemical bonding and equations, weather and climate, the universe and solar system, motion, forces, work, energy and power, and mechanical and electromagnetic waves.  Developing scientific inquiry skills through laboratory and computer activities is an integral part of this course.

Earth Science 101/102

Prerequisite: Two years of Science

This course will discuss the origin and basic structure of Earth along with a fundamental understanding of meteorology.  An examination of chemistry and the rock cycle will help to understand some common minerals and rocks of which our planet is made.  Many forces creating Earth’s ever-changing surface will be examined including weathering, plate tectonics, mountain building, earthquakes, volcanoes, and glaciers.  During the study of meteorology, the composition of the atmosphere and how energy, moisture, and winds determine the creation and movement of air masses, fronts, and severe weather systems will be investigated.  Climate patterns and changes, past and present, will be examined, and the impact of human activities on the Earth’s systems will be assessed.

Human Biology 101/102

Prerequisite: Two years of science and no previous Anatomy and Physiology coursework

Students will spend time gaining an understanding of the basic anatomy of the body.  The main focus of the course will be on human body systems and how they apply to health and wellness.  The topics in this course include basic anatomy terminology and positions, the tissues, and muscular, skeletal, nervous, digestive, reproductive, respiratory, lymphatic, cardiovascular, and nervous body systems.  The course will also present topics such as nutrition and forensic science.  This class is appropriate for students interested in the health and the human body but not for those interested in medical professions.

Scholarship Track

Scholarship Biology 101/102

Prerequisite: Recommendation from Guidance Department

This course is designed to give a basic understanding of the structure and function of living organisms at the cellular level.  Topics include basic biochemistry, the scientific method, metric system, respiration, and photosynthesis.  Ecology and the theory of evolution are studied, as well as the anatomy and physiology of animal systems and cell division and genetics.  Experiments and written reports are an essential part of this course.

Scholarship Physical Science 101/102

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation

This course introduces selected topics in Chemistry, Earth Science, and Physics.  Students will engage in expanding their understanding of scientific theories, ethical practices, practical applications, and the relationship between science, technology, and society.  Topics explored include the scientific method, science skills, matter, atomic theory, the periodic table, chemical bonding and equations, weather and climate, the universe and solar system, motion, forces, work, energy and power, and mechanical and electromagnetic waves.  Developing scientific inquiry skills through laboratory and computer activities is an integral part of this course.

Chemistry 101/102

Prerequisite: (Sophomores) 2.5 or above in Scholarship Biology and Scholarship Algebra I or 3.5 or above in Algebra I

Chemistry is the study of the composition of matter, the changes in composition, and the energy involved in these changes.  First semester topics include atomic structure, chemical periodicity, bonding, chemical names and formulas, and chemical and nuclear reactions.  Second semester topics include chemistry calculations, the mole concept, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, kinetic theory, and gas laws.  Laboratory work and written reports are an essential part of the course.

Physics I 101/102

Prerequisite: 2.5 or above in Chemistry I and concurrent enrollment in Scholarship Algebra II/Trigonometry or higher level

Physics is the study of matter and energy and their interdependencies.  First semester topics include linear motion, vector addition, projectiles, and dynamics.  During the second semester, the course continues the study of matter and energy relationships through the examination of energy and work, momentum conservation, static electricity, direct current circuits, and mechanical waves.  Equation manipulation, analysis, and problem solving will be emphasized, as well as a solid conceptual understanding of Newtonian Physics.  Laboratory investigations are emphasized as a method for understanding applied concepts.

Honors Track

The Honors Program is designed for students with high achievement levels who may be oriented toward a career in STEM fields like science, engineering, or medical fields.  Students are challenged in this level to produce to their maximum potential.  Each student in Honors Biology, Honors Chemistry, and AP Physics I is required to complete an independent pre-college research project and present it at the Carroll High School Science Day in February.

Honors Biology 101/102

Prerequisite: Recommendation from Guidance Department; It is recommended that the student be registered in Honors English or Honors Math.

This course is designed to give students the opportunity to develop a more in-depth knowledge of biological concepts, as well as a more thorough understanding of the scientific process.  First semester topics include an introduction to general inorganic and organic chemistry, cellular structure and organization, and photosynthesis.  Second semester topics include the study of evolution and classification, the interaction of living organisms with their environment, respiration, and genetics. Topics are covered in greater detail than in the Scholarship Biology course.  Learning through laboratory investigations is emphasized.

Honors Chemistry 101/102

Prerequisite: Unweighted 2.5 or above in Honors Biology or teacher recommendation

This course uses a laboratory approach to develop a more in-depth and mathematical study of chemistry.  After review of the scientific method and measurement, the following topics are covered first semester: matter and its changes, atomic structure, periodicity, bonding, formulas, equations, the mole concept, and chemical and nuclear reactions.  Second semester topics include stoichiometry, thermochemistry, the kinetic molecular theory of matter, the gas laws, and acid base theory.  Laboratory work is an integral part of this course.

Advanced Placement Physics 101/102

Prerequisite: Unweighted 2.5 or above in prior Honors Science and Mathematics classes and concurrent enrollment in Honors Algebra II/Trigonometry or higher; Summer work is required.

This course is the equivalent to a first-semester college course in Algebra-based Physics.  Topics covered include Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum), work, energy, and power, mechanical waves and sound, electrostatics, and electric circuits. This course places an emphasis on the development of problem solving, laboratory investigations, and independent study.

Advanced Placement Chemistry 201/202

Prerequisite: Unweighted 3.5 or above in Chemistry or Honors Chemistry and Algebra II/Trigonometry and teacher recommendation; Summer work is required.

This course expands upon the concepts presented in Chemistry and Honors Chemistry.  By the end of the first semester, students will understand and be able to apply mathematical solutions to problems involving atomic structure and properties, periodicity, nuclear chemistry, making and naming compounds, reactions, stoichiometry and related concepts, thermochemistry, and states of matter and concentration.  At the end of the second semester, students will understand and be able to apply mathematical solutions to problems involving chemical equilibria, kinetics, electrochemistry, oxidation and reduction systems, and basic organic and biochemistry.  Laboratory investigations and independent study are an integral part of the course.

Advanced Placement Biology 201/202

Prerequisite: Unweighted 2.5 or above in previous Honors Science classes and teacher recommendation

This course covers the content of a first-year college course for biology majors.  Some topics covered in first semester include basic chemistry and biochemistry, cell structure and function, energy transformations in living organisms, and ecology.  The second semester will cover the characteristics of the animal kingdom: nutrition, gas exchange, transport, excretion, reproduction, nervous systems and sense organs, muscular and skeletal systems, and the endocrine system and behavior.  Other aspects of the plant kingdom will also be studied including growth, nutrition, regulation, response, and flowering.  Finally, basic principles of ecology will be discussed.  Laboratory investigations and independent study are an integral part of the course.

Electives

Ecology

Prerequisite: Two years of Science

This course will present the biotic aspects of an ecosystem.  Topics will also include populations, sustainability, renewable and non-renewable resources, invasive species, and climate.  The students will develop an understanding of what an ecosystem is and the elements that determine the types and numbers of organisms that live there within their particulars biomes.  The course will also look at the role humans have had in changing each of these biomes and the impact these changes have had on the world.

Zoology

Prerequisite: Two years of Science

This course explores the tremendous diversity of animal life and the inter-connectedness of different animal species.  The course will explore the classification and characteristics of all the animal phyla, with an emphasis on the evolution of animals and the adaptations that have allowed such diversity to flourish.  Covering the major phylums of invertebrates and vertebrates including sponges, sting cell animals, worms, mollusks, fish, birds, and mammals. This course is appropriate for students who want to pursue a branch of animal science or students who want a better understanding of animal science and zoology.

Microbiology

Prerequisite: 2.5 or above in Scholarship Biology and Chemistry; 2.0 or above in Honors Biology or Honors Chemistry

This course involves the study of microbes, their environments, and their application in today’s world.  Laboratory work is an essential part of this course as students learn to perform the techniques used in the field of microbiology.  This course is designed to help prepare students for biology careers or to increase their awareness of the importance of microorganisms in their lives.

Department Faculty

Mrs. Laurie Fuhr, Co-chair

B.S. Science Education, Miami University

Mrs. Laura Wright, Co-chair

M.S. Biology, University of Dayton

Mrs. Janine Casey

M.S. Chemistry Education, DeSales University

Ms. Meghan Mulligan

B.A. Biology, Miami University; B.S. Chemistry Education, Miami University

Dr. Christina O' Malley

Ph. D. Biochemistry, The Ohio State University

Mrs. Allie (Walsh) Spurling '08

B.S. Earth and Life Sciences, Miami University

Mr. Todd Tayloe

M.S. Teaching - Earth Science, Wright State University